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027: What to do about elevated morning blood glucose in the mid 90s.

Masterjohn Q&A Files Episode 27

Introduction

Question: What to do about elevated morning blood glucose in the mid 90s.

I think usually your morning glucose is primarily impacted by your hormones and very rarely impacted by what you ate the night before, unless you are severely glucose intolerant.

So the overwhelming probability is that if your blood glucose is elevated in the morning and mid-90s is not tremendously high; it is most likely cortisol. 

If there are other signs of slipping into pre-diabetes then I might come up with another explanation, but I don't think waking up in the morning and often having mid-90s glucose — with everything else being fine, is likely to be a sign other than cortisol levels. 

It's not necessarily a bad thing because you're supposed to have a cortisol spike in the morning. You may want to look at your cortisol levels over time. The DUTCH test can do that. It happens to look at a lot of other things that I think are useful so that might be my first go-to. 

First you want to know if that's actually the issue. 

If cortisol is out of range then you probably want to look at stress reduction as a first step, and there's some evidence for using phosphatidylserine to lower cortisol. 

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The Masterjohn Q&A Files
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Authors
Chris Masterjohn, PhD